Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ir.swu.ac.th/jspui/handle/123456789/14276
Title: Sodium dodecyl sulfate-modified electrochemical paper-based analytical device for determination of dopamine levels in biological samples
Authors: Rattanarat P.
Dungchai W.
Siangproh W.
Chailapakul O.
Henry C.S.
Keywords: Ascorbic acids
Dopamine
ELectrochemical detection
Human serum
Paper-based analytical device
Sodium dodecyl sulfate
Uric acids
Amines
Analytic equipment
Anionic surfactants
Body fluids
Cationic surfactants
Diffusers (optical)
Ketones
Neurophysiology
Organic acids
Oxidation
Paper
Photoresists
Sulfur compounds
Voltammetry
Sodium sulfate
ascorbic acid
cationic surfactant
dodecyl sulfate sodium
dopamine
silver
silver chloride
tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide
unclassified drug
uric acid
analytical equipment
article
blood sampling
chemical interaction
concentration (parameters)
dopamine blood level
dopamine metabolism
electrochemical analysis
electrochemical paper based analytical device
film
filter
hydrophilicity
limit of detection
linear system
oxidation
paper
potentiometry
priority journal
quantitative analysis
static electricity
Dopamine
Electrochemical Techniques
Equipment Design
Humans
Paper
Sensitivity and Specificity
Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate
Amines
Amperometry
Ascorbic Acid
Electrochemistry
Layers
Organic Acids
Oxidation
Sodium Sulfate
Surfactants
Issue Date: 2012
Abstract: We report the development of an electrochemical paper-based analytical device (ePAD) for the selective determination of dopamine (DA) in model serum sample. The ePAD device consists of three layers. In the top layer, SU-8 photoresist defines a hydrophilic sample application spot on the filter paper. The middle layer was made from transparency film and contained two holes, one for sample preconcentration and the other for the surfactant to allow transfer to the third layer. A screen-printed carbon electrode formed the bottom layer and was used for electrochemical measurements. In the absence of the anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), the oxidation peaks of DA, ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA) overlapped. With the addition of SDS, the DA oxidation peak shifted to more negative values and was clearly distinguishable from AA and UA. The oxidation potential shift was presumably due to preferential electrostatic interactions between the cationic DA and the anionic SDS. Indeed, whilst the SDS-modified paper improved the DA current five-fold, the non-ionic Tween-20 and cationic tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide surfactants had no effect or reduced the current, respectively. Furthermore, only the SDS-modified paper showed the selective shift in oxidation potential for DA. DA determination was carried out using square-wave voltammetry between -0.2 and 0.8. V vs. Ag/AgCl, and this ePAD was able to detect DA over a linear range of 1-100μM with a detection limit (S/N = 3) of 0.37μM. The ePAD seems suitable as a low cost, easy-to-use, portable device for the selective quantitation of DA in human serum samples. © 2012 Elsevier B.V..
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84865552000&doi=10.1016%2fj.aca.2012.07.003&partnerID=40&md5=bcc5d45e8aba776c9bae34e98af90003
http://ir.swu.ac.th/jspui/handle/123456789/14276
ISSN: 32670
Appears in Collections:Scopus 1983-2021

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