Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ir.swu.ac.th/jspui/handle/123456789/13636
Title: The effects of oral vitamin D supplement on atopic dermatitis: A clinical trial with staphylococcus aureus colonization determination
Authors: Udompataikul M.
Huajai S.
Chalermchai T.
Taweechotipatr M.
Kamanamool N.
Keywords: 25 hydroxyvitamin D
cathelicidin
ergocalciferol
placebo
vitamin
vitamin D
adolescent
adult
Article
assessment of humans
atopic dermatitis
child
clinical article
colorimetry
controlled study
double blind procedure
drug efficacy
erythema
female
human
male
preschool child
pruritus
randomized controlled trial
school child
SCORAD score
skin conductance
skin edema
Staphylococcus aureus
Staphylococcus infection
vitamin supplementation
Dermatitis, Atopic
diet supplementation
drug effects
infant
isolation and purification
microbiology
pathology
skin
Staphylococcal Infections
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Dermatitis, Atopic
Dietary Supplements
Double-Blind Method
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Skin
Staphylococcal Infections
Staphylococcus aureus
Vitamin D
Vitamins
Issue Date: 2015
Abstract: Background: An increase in Staphylococcus aureus skin colonization in atopic dermatitis patients resulted from the reduction of cathelicidin production in these patients. Recently, an in vivo study demonstrated that vitamin D could stimulate cathelicidin production. Oral supplements of vitamin D might be beneficial in atopic dermatitis. Objective: To determine the effects of oral vitamin D supplements on clinical impact including Staphylococcus aureus skin colonization evaluation in atopic dermatitis patients. Material and Method: Twenty-four atopic dermatitis patients were included in this double-blind, placebo-controlled study. They were randomly assigned into 2 groups for oral 2,000 IUs/day of vitamin D2 supplement and placebo. The lesional swab culture for S. aureus was done at week 0, 2 and 4. Clinical outcomes were assessed by SCORAD score, mexameter for erythema index and konometer for conductance were done at week 0, 2 and 4. Serum vitamin D levels were also determined at week 0 and 4. Results: Twenty patients completed the protocol. S. aureus skin colonization, SCORAD score and erythema index were significantly reduced from baseline to week 4 for vitamin D treated group comparing with placebo (p = 0.022, 0.028 and 0.014, respectively). There was an inverse correlation between serum vitamin D levels with S. aureus skin colonization and SCORAD score (r = -1.0, p<0.001). Conclusion: Oral vitamin D supplement could reduce skin colonization of S.aureus and demonstrated the clinical improvement of patients with atopic dermatitis. © 2015, Medical Association of Thailand. All rights reserved.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84957708772&partnerID=40&md5=f430767dc1ae3c29401e2e1c45da0ef0
http://ir.swu.ac.th/jspui/handle/123456789/13636
ISSN: 1252208
Appears in Collections:Scopus 1983-2021

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