Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ir.swu.ac.th/jspui/handle/123456789/13340
Title: Effect of zinc plus multivitamin supplementation on growth in school children
Authors: Rerksuppaphol S.
Rerksuppaphol L.
Keywords: cyanocobalamin
nicotinamide
pyridoxine
retinol
riboflavin
thiamine
unclassified drug
vitamin D
zinc bis glycinate
zinc derivative
vitamin
zinc
Article
body height
body weight
child
child growth
child parent relation
controlled study
diet supplementation
female
hip circumference
human
informed consent
male
normal human
outcome assessment
priority journal
randomized controlled trial
Thailand
waist circumference
waist to height ratio
adolescent
child development
dietary supplement
dose response
drug effects
preschool child
reference value
school
single blind procedure
Adolescent
Body Height
Body Weight
Child
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Dietary Supplements
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Humans
Male
Reference Values
Schools
Single-Blind Method
Thailand
Vitamins
Zinc
Issue Date: 2016
Abstract: Background: Zinc and multiple vitamins are essential for growth. Zinc and vitamin deficiency is very common in developing countries. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of zinc plus multivitamin supplements in improving growth of healthy Thai schoolchildren. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was conducted in healthy 4–13-year-old Thai schoolchildren attending public school in central Thailand. Participants were randomized to receive either chelated zinc in the form of zinc bis-glycinate (20 mg elemental zinc) plus multivitamins (vitamin A, 1000 IU; vitamin D, 200 IU; B1, 10 mg; B2, 3 mg; B6, 1 mg; B12, 10 μg; nicotinamide, 40 mg) or placebo once per day, 5 days per week for 6 months. Primary outcome was change in height from baseline to the end of the study. Secondary outcomes were change in weight, body mass index, waist and hip circumferences and waist-to-height ratio. An intention-to-treat analysis was performed. Results: Seventy children each were randomized to the treatment and placebo groups. The children who received zinc and multivitamins had significantly higher gain in height (4.9 ± 1.3 vs 3.6 ± 0.9 cm, respectively; P < 0.001). Subgroup analysis showed significant improvement in height, especially in preadolescents. The increased gain in height was irrespective of baseline height and weight. The extra gain in height occurred after 2 months of supplementation. The changes in other anthropometric indices were not significantly different. Conclusion: Supplementation of chelated zinc plus multivitamins for 6 months significantly increased height gain in Thai schoolchildren and was well tolerated. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84994378051&doi=10.1111%2fped.13011&partnerID=40&md5=83c0b2c57de9df12ab6f7b0f3b65f5b9
http://ir.swu.ac.th/jspui/handle/123456789/13340
ISSN: 13288067
Appears in Collections:SCOPUS 1983-2021

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