Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ir.swu.ac.th/jspui/handle/123456789/12393
Title: Survival Advantage of African American Dialysis Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease Causes Related to APOL1
Authors: Lertdumrongluk P.
Streja E.
Rhee C.M.
Moradi H.
Chang Y.
Reddy U.
Tantisattamo E.
Kalantar-Zadeh K.
Kopp J.B.
Keywords: apolipoprotein L1
APOL1 protein, human
apolipoprotein L1
adult
African American
all cause mortality
antiretroviral therapy
Article
cancer staging
cardiovascular mortality
cohort analysis
diabetes mellitus
dialysis
end stage renal disease
female
genetic variation
glomerulonephritis
glomerulosclerosis
heart arrest
heart failure
hemodialysis
hospitalization
human
hypertension
kidney transplantation
major clinical study
male
middle aged
mortality rate
observational study
peritoneal dialysis
prevalence
priority journal
race
renal replacement therapy
survival rate
adolescent
African American
Caucasian
cause of death
chronic kidney failure
epidemiology
genetic predisposition
genetics
hemodialysis
mortality
proportional hazards model
United States
young adult
Adolescent
Adult
African Americans
Apolipoprotein L1
Cause of Death
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Variation
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Renal Dialysis
United States
Young Adult
Issue Date: 2019
Abstract: Background: Observational studies show that African American (AA) dialysis patients have longer survival than European Americans. We hypothesized that apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1) genetic variation, associated with nephropathy in AAs, contributes to the survival advantage in AA dialysis patients. Methods: We examined the association between race and mortality among 37,097 adult dialysis patients, including 54% AAs and 46% European Americans from a large dialysis organization (entry period from July 2001 to June 2006, follow-up through June 2007), within each cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) category associated with APOL1 renal risk variants using Cox proportional hazard models. Results: AA dialysis patients had numerically lower mortality than their European American counterparts for all causes of ESRD. The mortality reduction among AAs compared to European Americans was statistically significant in patients with ESRD attributed to diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and APOL1-enriched glomerulonephritis (GN) (HR [95% CI]: 0.69 [0.66-0.72], 0.73 [0.68-0.79], and 0.89 [0.79-0.99], respectively); these are conditions in which APOL1 variants promote kidney disease. By contrast, the significant survival advantage of AA dialysis patients was not observed in patients with ESRD attributed to other kidney disease (including polycystic kidney disease, interstitial nephritis, and pyelonephritis) and other GN, which are not associated with APOL1 variants. Conclusions: These data suggest the hypothesis that the relative survival advantage of AA dialysis patients may be related to APOL1 variation. Further large population-based genetic studies are required to test this hypothesis. © 2019 Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85064930982&doi=10.1159%2f000496472&partnerID=40&md5=8ef85b752a73f023fe2f2805859b4863
http://ir.swu.ac.th/jspui/handle/123456789/12393
ISSN: 16643828
Appears in Collections:Scopus 1983-2021

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