Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ir.swu.ac.th/jspui/handle/123456789/12293
Title: Craniopharyngiomas presenting as incidentalomas: results of KRANIOPHARYNGEOM 2007
Authors: Boekhoff S.
Bison B.
Eveslage M.
Sowithayasakul P.
Müller H.L.
Keywords: adolescent
age
Article
body height
body mass
body weight gain
cancer radiotherapy
cancer surgery
cerebral palsy
child
clinical feature
clinical outcome
controlled study
craniopharyngioma
female
functional status
growth hormone deficiency
growth retardation
head injury
headache
hormone deficiency
human
hydrocephalus
hypopituitarism
hypothalamic obesity
hypothalamus disease
hypothalamus lesion
imaging
incidental finding
incidentaloma
major clinical study
male
mental deficiency
nausea
nose obstruction
polydipsia
polyuria
prematurity
preschool child
priority journal
puberty disorders
quality of life
school child
sex difference
survival rate
symptomatology
tethered cord syndrome
tumor localization
tumor volume
visual field defect
visual impairment
vomiting
adrenal tumor
craniopharyngioma
newborn
pathology
Adolescent
Adrenal Gland Neoplasms
Child
Craniopharyngioma
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Issue Date: 2019
Abstract: Purpose: Childhood-onset craniopharyngiomas (CP) are diagnosed due to clinical symptoms (symCP) or incidentally (incCP). We investigated clinical manifestations and outcome in incCPs and symCPs. Methods: IncCP were discovered in 4 (3 m/1 f) and symCP in 214 (101 m/113 f) CP recruited 2007–2014 in KRANIOPHARYNGEOM 2007. Age, sex, height, body mass index (BMI), tumor volume, degree of resection, pre- and postsurgical hypothalamic involvement/lesions, pituitary function and outcome were compared between both subgroups. Results: Reasons for imaging in incCP were cerebral palsy, head trauma, nasal obstruction, and tethered-cord syndrome, whereas headache (44%), visual impairment (25%), and growth retardation (17%) lead to imaging in symCP. Tumor volume at diagnosis was smaller in incCP (median 2.39 cm3; range 0.14–4.10 cm3) when compared with symCP (15.86 cm3; 0.002–286.34 cm3). Age, gender, BMI, height, hydrocephalus, tumor location, and hypothalamic involvement at diagnosis of incCP were within the range of these parameters in symCP. Complete resections were achieved more frequently (3/4 patients) in incCP when compared with symCP (20%). Surgical hypothalamic lesions were distributed similar in incCP and symCP. Irradiation was performed only in symCP (33%). No noticeable differences were observed concerning survival rates, endocrine deficiencies, BMI, height, functional capacity and quality of life of the 4 incCP cases when compared with the symCP cohort. Conclusions: IncCP are rare (1.8%) and characterized by lack of endocrine deficiencies, resulting in normal height and BMI, no hydrocephalus, and smaller tumor volume at diagnosis when compared with symCPs. Outcome of the observed incCP is similar with symCP. Clinical trial registration number: NCT01272622. © 2019, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85070947975&doi=10.1007%2fs11102-019-00983-7&partnerID=40&md5=9720b07f1d29fd6f4aff55ab37e35195
http://ir.swu.ac.th/jspui/handle/123456789/12293
ISSN: 1386341X
Appears in Collections:SCOPUS 1983-2021

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