Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ir.swu.ac.th/jspui/handle/123456789/15007
Title: Effect of fruit and vegetable intake on skin carotenoid detected by non-invasive Raman spectroscopy
Authors: Rerksuppaphol S.
Rerksuppaphol L.
Keywords: carotenoid
adult
article
body mass
body weight
controlled study
demography
female
food intake
fruit
height
human
human experiment
male
normal human
Raman spectrometry
skin
underweight
vegetable
Adult
Carotenoids
Diet
Eating
Female
Fruit
Humans
Male
Skin
Spectrum Analysis, Raman
Vegetables
Issue Date: 2006
Abstract: Background: Epidemiologic studies found the inverse correlation between fruit and vegetable intake and the risk of cardiovascular disease, various cancers, insulin resistance, and other chronic conditions. Skin carotenoid levels are highly correlated with serum levels; however, the direct measurement of skin carotenoids is difficult to perform. Raman spectroscopy has been described as a highly sensitive, specific and accurate method of skin carotenoid detection. Objective: The authors assessed the relation between fruit and vegetable intake and skin carotenoid levels measured by Raman spectroscopy. Material and Method: Twenty-nine healthy volunteers were enrolled in the present study. Demographic data and fruit and vegetable intake were recorded. Skin carotenoid levels were measured by Raman spectroscopy and were reported as Skin Carotenoid Score (SCS). The data were compared and were reported as 3 groups based on the amounts of fruit and vegetable intake. Results: There were no significant differences of age, body weight, height and body mass index among the groups. Mean skin carotenoid score of low fruit and vegetable intake (25,733 ± 2,956) was significantly lower than SCS of moderate intake (31,333 ± 4,792, p = 0.03) and high fruit and vegetable intake (35,125 ± 6,081, p < 0.01). Mean SCS of underweight participants (29,250 ± 4,621) was not significantly different from normal (33,384 ± 6,614) and overweight participants (27,575 ± 3,811), p = 0.06. Conclusion: Using Raman spectroscopy, the authors found that skin carotenoid levels were directly correlated with the degree of fruit and vegetable intakes. We suggest that Raman spectroscopy should be possible to replace the invasive chemical technique for the dermatologic carotenoid measurement.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-33748508835&partnerID=40&md5=34352e1121d67e60930b4c5ef47066e9
http://ir.swu.ac.th/jspui/handle/123456789/15007
ISSN: 1252208
Appears in Collections:SCOPUS 1983-2021

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