Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ir.swu.ac.th/jspui/handle/123456789/14553
Title: Anatomy and histology of the lower urinary tract
Authors: Pradidarcheep W.
Wallner C.
Dabhoiwala N.F.
Lamers W.H.
Keywords: animal anatomy
article
bladder muscle
bladder sphincter
bulbourethral gland
comparative anatomy
connective tissue
embryo development
evolutionary developmental biology
gonad development
histology
human
kidney structure
levator ani muscle
micturition
morphology
nonhuman
pelvis floor
perineum
priority journal
prostate
rodent
sex difference
smooth muscle
species difference
urethra
urine incontinence
urothelium
vesicular gland
animal
evolution
female
histology
innervation
male
mouse
pelvis floor
prenatal development
rabbit
review
urodynamics
Animals
Biological Evolution
Female
Humans
Male
Mice
Pelvic Floor
Rabbits
Sex Factors
Species Specificity
Urethra
Urodynamics
Issue Date: 2011
Abstract: The function of the lower urinary tract is basically storage of urine in the bladder and the at-will periodic evacuation of the stored urine. Urinary incontinence is one of the most common lower urinary tract disorders in adults, but especially in the elderly female. The urethra, its sphincters, and the pelvic floor are key structures in the achievement of continence, but their basic anatomy is little known and, to some extent, still incompletely understood. Because questions with respect to continence arise from human morbidity, but are often investigated in rodent animal models, we present findings in human and rodent anatomy and histology. Differences between males and females in the role that the pelvic floor plays in the maintenance of continence are described. Furthermore, we briefly describe the embryologie origin of ureters, bladder, and urethra, because the developmental origin of structures such as the vesicoureteral junction, the bladder trigone, and the penile urethra are often invoked to explain (clinical) observations. As the human pelvic floor has acquired features in evolution that are typical for a species with bipedal movement, we also compare the pelvic floor of humans with that of rodents to better understand the rodent (or any other quadruped, for that matter) as an experimental model species. The general conclusion is that the "Bauplan" is well conserved, even though its common features are sometimes difficult to discern. © 2011 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-79952238373&doi=10.1007%2f978-3-642-16499-6_7&partnerID=40&md5=32db44e93057a6bf19c4b400c78a104e
http://ir.swu.ac.th/jspui/handle/123456789/14553
ISSN: 1712004
Appears in Collections:Scopus 1983-2021

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