Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ir.swu.ac.th/jspui/handle/123456789/12381
Title: Walking meditation promotes ankle proprioception and balance performance among elderly women
Authors: Chatutain A.
Pattana J.
Parinsarum T.
Lapanantasin S.
Keywords: aged
analysis of variance
ankle
article
Berg Balance Scale
controlled study
female
human
human experiment
major clinical study
meditation
nonparametric test
post hoc analysis
proprioception
randomized controlled trial
timed up and go test
training
walking
ankle
body equilibrium
meditation
middle aged
pathophysiology
physiology
procedures
proprioception
psychology
very elderly
walking
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ankle Joint
Female
Humans
Meditation
Middle Aged
Postural Balance
Proprioception
Walking
Issue Date: 2019
Abstract: Background: Age-related change of proprioception affects body balance among the elderly. Walking meditation (WM)—a mindfulness practice—involves focusing on leg movements while walking slowly, possibly improving brain processes for perception and balance adjustments. This study investigates the WM's effects on ankle proprioception and balance among the elderly. Methods: Fifty-eight women aged 69.25 ± 6.06 were randomized into control (n = 29) and WM (n = 29) groups. The WM group engaged in 8 weeks of WM practice (30 min/day, 3 days/week). The absolute angular error of the ankle reposition test (AAE) was measured by an electrogoniometer. The balance performance was evaluated using the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Functional Reach Test (FRT), and Timed Up and Go test (TUG). Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc test and BBS with nonparametric statistics. Results: At baseline, the WM group's AAE, BBS, FRT, and TUG were 4.2 ± 1.6°, 51.3 ± 4.1 points, 21.7 ± 5.7 cm, and 11.1 ± 2.5 s, respectively, whereas those of the control group were 3.6 ± 2.0°, 51.0 ± 5.0 points, 21.6 ± 5.2 cm, and 10.2 ± 3.1 s, respectively. Post-training, WM group showed significant decrease in AAE (2.4 ± 0.9°) and displayed improvements in BBS, FRT, and TUG (55.4 ± 0.9 points, 29.1 ± 5.8 cm, and 8.1 ± 1.1 s, respectively) (p < 0.01). Conversely, the control group presented no change in AAE, significant decreases in BBS and FRT, and slower TUG (p < 0.01). No difference was found between WM and control groups at the baseline. However, post-training, WM group demonstrated significant improvements in AAE, BBS, FRT, and TUG as compared to the control group (p < 0.001). Conclusions: WM practice improved the balance and ankle reposition sense among the elderly. It can be used as an alternative form of training to promote balance and ankle proprioception. The results supported that balance performance worsens among the elders who do not engage in physical training. © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85056153243&doi=10.1016%2fj.jbmt.2018.09.152&partnerID=40&md5=f457d59db23df16cff3bdc67f6f62fa9
http://ir.swu.ac.th/jspui/handle/123456789/12381
ISSN: 13608592
Appears in Collections:Scopus 1983-2021

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