Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ir.swu.ac.th/jspui/handle/123456789/12287
Title: Oral Candida colonization in xerostomic postradiotherapy head and neck cancer patients
Authors: Tarapan S.
Matangkasombut O.
Trachootham D.
Sattabanasuk V.
Talungchit S.
Paemuang W.
Phonyiam T.
Chokchaitam O.
Mungkung O.-O.
Lam-ubol A.
Keywords: adult
aged
Article
cancer radiotherapy
Candida
Candida albicans
Candida glabrata
Candida tropicalis
clinical trial
female
fungal colonization
head and neck cancer
human
major clinical study
male
mouth
nonhuman
pH
polymerase chain reaction
priority journal
risk factor
salivation
scoring system
xerostomia
bacterial count
Candida
drug effect
growth, development and aging
head and neck tumor
metabolism
microbiology
middle aged
mouth
radiation response
saliva
salivary gland
secretion rate
thrush
xerostomia
Adult
Aged
Candida
Candida albicans
Candidiasis, Oral
Colony Count, Microbial
Female
Head and Neck Neoplasms
Humans
Middle Aged
Mouth
Saliva
Salivary Glands
Secretory Rate
Xerostomia
Issue Date: 2019
Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate (a) oral colonization of Candida species, especially for non-albicans Candida species (NACS), in xerostomic postradiotherapy head and neck cancer patients and (b) risk factors affecting their colonization. Materials and methods: Subjective and objective dry mouth scores, stimulated salivary flow rates, pH and buffering capacity were measured in 72 xerostomic postradiotherapy head and neck cancer patients. Candida counts and species identification were performed using oral rinse samples cultured in Candida Chromagar, followed by polymerase chain reaction and API 20C AUX system. Results: Candida colonization was observed in 87.5% of subjects, with 80.6% and 48.6% of study population colonized by C. albicans and NACS, respectively. NACS was associated with high objective dry mouth scores, denture use, and females (p =.006,.009, and.036, respectively). In addition, Candida glabrata was detected more in females (p =.018) and denture wearers (p =.026), while Candida tropicalis was associated with high objective dry mouth scores (p =.022) and females (p =.027). Quantity of Candida colonization correlated positively with objective dry mouth scores (r = 0.599, p <.001) and negatively with salivary flow rates (r = −0.258, p =.041) and pH (r = −0.290, p =.022). Conclusion: NACS colonization was common in xerostomic head and neck cancer patients. Increased signs of dry mouth, female and dental prostheses may promote NACS colonization. © 2019 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved
URI: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85070114086&doi=10.1111%2fodi.13151&partnerID=40&md5=2a7a9fd92259adc7898e461cafe29ea4
http://ir.swu.ac.th/jspui/handle/123456789/12287
ISSN: 1354523X
Appears in Collections:SCOPUS 1983-2021

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